Weston Apple and Fruit Crusher

Weston Apple and Fruit Crusher

  • Easy to turn handle makes crushing large quantities of fruit quick an easy
  • Horizontal table mount or vertical corner wall mount options available
  • Heavy-duty cast iron construction
  • Stainless Steel chute and hardware
  • Includes wood mounting base (10 inch x 17.5 inch x 1 inch)

A great addition to the Weston Fruit & Wine Press….the manual Apple & Fruit Crusher simply crushes apples, pears or other hard fruits, preparing them for pressing

List Price: $ 199.99

Price: [wpramaprice asin=”B000XB5UHE”]

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3 thoughts on “Weston Apple and Fruit Crusher

  1. 37 of 38 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Love it!, November 11, 2010
    By 

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Weston Apple and Fruit Crusher (Kitchen)
    I bought this grinder to use with the Weston fruit press which I also purchased. (see copy of review below…) It worked really well. My apples are not large, so I didn’t have the problem of the apples needing to be cut to feed through. Easy to use and easy to clean with a garden hose. I got just over a gallon of cider for every five gallons of whole apples. It only took about five minutes (or less) to grind each five gallon bucket. I made 25 gallons of cider in six or seven hours…

    From my review of the Weston press: “After reading the positive and negative reviews, I decided to go ahead and buy the Weston press and grinder from Amazon this fall to juice apples from our trees. I found it worked very well, and in fact can’t wait until next year to do it all again! Many of the issues in the negative reviews are not that big of a deal. In fact many of the complaints are simply not well founded. Yes, the ratchet only advances a quarter inch per pull, but this means you’re getting that much more torque as well. Yes, the wood blocks tend to move a little, especially when starting a new press batch, but a little steadying as the ratchet decends keeps them in line until the pressure is sufficient to hold them in place. I found that when pressing our ground apples (I also used the Weston grinder), I got the best results by only loading the press to about 50% capacity. This is the equivalent of about a five gallon bucket of whole apples before grinding. By only loading it to 50%, the pressure per square inch on the fruit is increased by at least double when compared to the pressure on a full press. I got about 20% more juice per press by only loading it to half. I did not press the fruit twice as per the directions, simply due to time constraints as I wanted to get through all of our apples.

    I was worried that I would need to make some pressing bags, but did not find that necessary for apples. The design of the press keeps the apple flesh in place during compaction, and I used a simple kitchen strainer as I poured the juice into the jugs for freezing to remove any larger pieces. A friend came by to juice some pears, and I wished I had lined the inside of the wooden pess barrel with a flour sack, or made some simple bags to retain the pear flesh, as it was kind of a mess. I haven’t tried grapes or any other soft fruits, as we can’t grow them where I live. I would imagine based on the experience with the pears that you would want to use something.

    It seems to me that those who had negative experiences expected too much and weren’t willing to put forth a little extra elbow grease and patience to make it successful. It’s not rocket science, and there is no “on/off” switch. It’s a well-built and sturdy version of technology that is thousands of years old. My only criticism is that I wish the mouth of the spout dropped a little lower. Sometimes the juice did not pour cleanly off the spout, but tracked back on the bottom of the pan before dripping. No big deal, but seems like a simple design fix.

    I would highly recommend the press and grinder. I got more than 25 gallons of fresh juice/cider in about six or seven hours of work. We’ll enjoy it all winter now!”

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  2. 17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    You’ll still have to chop the apples first., December 20, 2009
    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Weston Apple and Fruit Crusher (Kitchen)
    I bought this in conjunction with the cider press. I was hoping it would take a step out of the process. While it does deliver the apples crushed to the consistency needed to make cider, you will still have to chop them before using this crusher.

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  3. 11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Weston Apple and Fruit Crusher, November 3, 2011
    By 
    xplornevada (Salt Lake City, UT) –

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Weston Apple and Fruit Crusher (Kitchen)
    I bought a house with several apple trees on property, and wanted to make the best use of all of the apples by converting the juice into hard cider. First I attempted to grind apples for cider by using a new garbage disposal, but the disposal broke the bitter seeds open and kept overheating.
    I love using this fruit crusher. I can fit all but the very largest apples into the feed chute. Anyone who has at least moderate upper body strength can easily use this to crush apples and pears. It’s pretty efficient, it takes me about five minutes to crush a half-bushel of apples, which is how much my homemade press basket can handle. It’s easy to clean out with a garden hose spray nozzle, and easy to disassemble for the post-season cleaning. I think it will last a while because it’s quite heavy.
    I would have given it five stars, but I made a few modifications to make mine easier to use. I attached a crank to the turn handle with some u-bolts so I could turn it continuously without having to grab for the spokes in its original configuration. Also, mine was tight to turn when it was brand new, I shaved off a tiny bit of the side of the grinding drum where it was rubbing on the housing and that took care of the problem. The manufacturer also sells a fairly expensive hopper to put on top, but I built my own out of scrap wood.
    I would recommend this crusher for anyone who would like to make 10-200 gallons of juice a year. Any less can use a juicer–any more should get a motor-driven scratter.

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