Will You Tolerate This? [HD]

Will You Tolerate This? [HD]

List Price: $ 2.99

Price: [wpramaprice asin=”B003OWWKMM”]

[wpramareviews asin=”B003OWWKMM”]

3 thoughts on “Will You Tolerate This? [HD]

  1. 123 of 144 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A classic ROBIN HOOD, March 11, 2007
    By 
    Karen A. Fleming “cat lady” (Tulsa, Ok USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Robin Hood: Season One (DVD)
    I ordered this ROBIN HOOD after seeing only 2 episodes. I don’t usually do that; I usually read all the customer reviews before making up my mind to buy something. Why did I jump in so early? This looks like being a classic ROBIN HOOD.

    The pilot and first episode are fantastic. The pilot retells the familiar story of how Robin returns from war in the Holy Land and becomes an outlaw, and does so with wit and verve, in true swashbuckling style — and with a beautifully light touch of humor. If you have seen THE PRINCESS BRIDE, you have seen a similar style of humor to that used here. But in that movie humor is a large element of its content. It is a very small but important element in the RH pilot.

    The first episode turns very gritty; and the humor becomes a much lighter, smaller element. The Sheriff of Nottingham takes over Robin’s former estate (like the terrorists took over a Russian school a few years back) and starts cutting out people’s tongues — one peasant at a time — in an effort to make them tell him where Robin is. Meanwhile, Robin is having his own troubles with the outlaws of Sherwood Forest, who see him as an enemy from the upper class. This is a complex story with complex people and very believable motivations.

    The writing is very sharp; the acting is spot on. It is beautiful. Do I have any complaints? Well… I could be a little picky and say people really didn’t bathe much back then; and when the Sheriff says, “Tick, tock, tick, tock…” to indicate time is passing and he is getting tired of waiting for someone to tell him what he wants to know… ordinary people didn’t have mechanical clocks back then. But, hey, this is a legend not history. And it is superb.

    I love this ROBIN HOOD.

    0

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  2. 69 of 87 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    More Whimsical Than Dangerous–A Very Modern BBC “Robin Hood” Can Still Be An Adventure, April 8, 2007
    By 
    K. Harris “Film aficionado” (StudioCityGuy33 at Yahoo dot com) –
    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)
      
    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)
      

    This review is from: Robin Hood: Season One (DVD)
    I’ll be the first one to tell you–I’m sophisticated and classy. You know why? I watch BBCAmerica, and the Brits–they are the leaders of urbane and upscale entertainment. If you need any convincing, just watch an episode of “Footballer’s Wives,” “Mile High,” or “Bad Girls.” Of course, I’m kidding. These shows are brassy, bawdy, and loaded with bad behavior! But, you know what, they are also filled with life. They embrace their nastiness wholeheartedly and make no apologies for being pure popcorn entertainment. With language and nudity not permitted by American networks, it seems as if the genre of nighttime soaps has been revitalized by Britain. But that’s not all BBCAmerica has to offer, they are just the shows that helped the network grow in popularity. Some other intriguing entries that recently aired in the US are on their way to DVD–there is a new hip take on “Robin Hood,” the supernatural “Hex,” and the complex crime story “Conviction.” So beware! The British are coming, the British are coming–and it’s a good thing!

    On preparing to sit through “Robin Hood,” it’s best to know what to anticipate. If you’re expecting any sort of historical insight or don’t want anyone tampering with the “classic” tale of Mr. Hood–then I’d advise you to take a pass. Do I need to say what “Robin Hood” is about? Robin is a former noble who becomes an outlaw and forms a posse to (duh!) rob from the rich to give to the poor. This version casts attractive actors, employs anachronistic language, and is firmly rooted in modern (and politically correct) sensibilities. The production is slick, stunts and camerawork exemplary–this is a well crafted entertainment. Most episodes move at a brisk and amusing pace, and even when things seem to lack real danger–the series more than compensates with humor. The plots aren’t particularly revelatory, but any lack of originality is likely to be forgiven due to the energetic and likable performances.

    And the success of this “Robin Hood” rest squarely on Jonas Armstrong’s shoulders. Armstrong is a star! Perhaps a bit slight for a true action hero, Armstrong is wildly appealing and has great comic timing. His need to be loved by the people is a running gag and one that works exceedingly well–but, then again, who wouldn’t love this Robin? Keith Allen is a stellar Sheriff of Nottingham, this is comic villainy at its finest. Richard Armitage as Guy of Gisborne is the show’s real menace and does a nice job with a somewhat underwritten part. Lucy Griffiths plays an earnest Marion–updated to hero status herself just to be fair. At first, the show had trouble incorporating Marion into the main action and her tone was always more somber–but a balance is reached as the show progresses. The secondary players are a bit more sketchy, but are employed to good effect when necessary.

    If this version of “Robin Hood” is guilty of anything, it might be a “too cool for school” mentality. It is so intent on being clever with ironic humor and modern attitudes that the sheer adventure is sometimes secondary. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoyed this updating–it just tries so hard to be “hip.” From the whimsical episode titles through to the inevitable laugh that ends just about every episode, “Robin Hood” almost defies you to take it seriously–and yet, its ultimate success depends on you doing so. I wanted to be blown away be this series, but the episodes end up being more of a lark than anything else. Fun, frothy and not very filling–I still give this 4 (maybe 3 1/2) stars. I see “Hood” having the potential to develop more compelling story arcs with greater ambition, let’s see if that happens when Season 2 rolls around. KGHarris, 04/07.

    0

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  3. 11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    A Bit Tedious ***Season Finale Spoilers***, January 18, 2009
    By 
    Randy (Reno, Nevada USA) –

    So, I finally finished Robin Hood Season 1 by the BBC and I have to say I like it… but it has a LOT of problems. The first and foremost being how nearly every damned episode has Robin and his men rescuing a member of his gang, a complete stranger, a towns person, whatever from the castle or else they’ll be hanged the next day. There’s plenty of potential for other stories, but the writers never use it. I love the characters and the setting, but when they’re all sneaking into the castle (again) to rescue someone from being hanged the next day (again) it gets a little tiresome.

    Secondly, I’m tired of the “We introduce something during this episode and you know by the end it’ll be used in some way shape or form for the conclusion”. Only occasionally will something be introduced a couple episodes prior and then come into play later on down the road. It’s just so… sit-com-ish, and nothing I would expect from a show of this caliber. Resolving everything within an hour may work well with something like Law & Order, but not so much with a story that should be continuous and have some continuity.

    My third gripe was the season finale. I thought it was set up well enough… but WHAT THE HELL happened in those last few minutes?!?!?! I mean, the show’s had plenty of corny moments and what have you, but that was just stupid. They finally set up a story that had other elements unused by the writers, but it was all soiled come the end with Robin ricocheting an arrow, tied to a rope, off the ceiling, hitting the sheriffs SANDLE between his toes and hoisting him up in the air in front of everybody at the “festival of pain”. Robin proceeds to simply stroll out of the building with his men and whomever else he was rescuing that time, and on the steps of the castle they have an obnoxiously corny moment where the group all jumps in the air in congratulations and the scene freezes in that gray photo-esque look as it’s been known to do every episode.

    Why didn’t the sheriff send his guards after them? Hell, why didn’t the sheriff simply slip out of his damned sandle? Why did the fake king simply stand there? Did anybody believe Robin that he was indeed a fake king? Will Marian’s father be able to simply go back to his home and wait for other kooky shenanigans to rise from Robin and his merry band of thieves or will the Sheriff simply put a guard at his house and kill him as soon as he walks through the door?

    All in all, it’s a nice show to mellow out to. It doesn’t take itself too seriously, it has a couple of nice “OH CRAP!” moments that I enjoyed. But it’s just such an aggravating show. I want to like it so badly, but I simply want to hate it as well for the lazy writing and things that simply don’t add up. Maybe season 2 is better, maybe the show has found its feet by then? I guess I’ll just have to wait and see.

    0

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Proudly powered by WordPress
Theme: Esquire by Matthew Buchanan.